Warning signs and fencing go up at tragic Turleigh field

Electric fencing and new signs warning about the dangers of walking dogs near cattle have been put up in Turleigh, near Winsley – where a man was trampled to death by cows last week.

Retired university lecturer Mike Porter, 66, was crushed when the 30-strong herd stampeded at Easter Field as he walked two dogs with his brother John, who suffered a collapsed lung and broken ribs in the incident.

John, 72, who lives at Crossways in Monkton Combe, was airlifted by air ambulance to the major trauma centre at Frenchay Hospital, Bristol, but is now back home, where he is making good progress.

His wife Mary, 77, witnessed the attack, which was the fourth in five years in the village, and concerns have been raised over the herd, owned by farmer Brian Godwin.

The yellow and black signs, which warn of the dangers of having dogs near cattle, are produced by the National Farmers’ Union and are handed out at farming shows around the country.

The signs say: “Your dog can scare or harm farm animals – Keep it on a lead around livestock, but let go if chased by cattle.”

Ian Johnson, south west spokesman for the NFU, reiterated the advice for dog walkers, and said: “If anyone feels threatened by cattle, they should let their dog off the lead and fend for itself.”

A service for Michael Porter will take place on Monday at Edinburgh University, before being followed by a private cremation for family and friends.

Meanwhile, a joint investigation between police and the Health & Safety Executive is under way.

This is Wiltshire

Comments

    • You write: “… the attack, which was the fourth in five years in the village, and concerns have been raised over the herd, owned by farmer Brian Godwin.”

      I am truly confused at what you mean to say. Is the farmer named raising a herd of mutant or especially vicious cows?

      This is a sad and tragic accident of the type that happens across the country from time to time, and my sympathies go out to all concerned.

      Alas, there is no way to ‘legislate’ against such accidents — unless, of course, we wish to prohibit public access to the countryside or force farmers to fence off all livestock (which will ruin not just the countryside itself, but the farmers’ livelihoods as well.)

      Walkers have a responsibility to take care as best as they can when encountering livestock – especially when walking dogs. If in doubt, they should use alternative routes.

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