AskBoA: Pedestrian Safety

I know the pedestrian safety is a big issue in the town so here’s a proposal based on research and evidence on integrated transport systems
About 15 years ago I made a TV documentary on trying to solve transport problems in towns and cities. We filmed in Denmark as they were one of the leading countries who had made great strides in developing an integrated transport system where pedestrians and cyclist took priority over the car.
I am sure from my experience with the Danish experts their solution for Bradford on Avon would be –
NOT to develop a one way system for cars – cars drive faster in one way systems
To solve the bridge problem they would narrow the road so that it is just wide enough for a bus and a car to pass. Their thought would be that this would make drivers drive slowly and carefully to avoid losing their wing mirrors. And additionally to avoid driving through the town because it would be a slower option than finding alternative routes
They would use the space gained to widen the paths. They would make the kerbs higher so that it would be virtually impossible to mount the kerb.
In the mid 90’s Denmark introduce 20mph  is plenty in towns and cities especially around and near schools – we in Bradford are just about to
If the town was in Denmark they would use the space gained by creating only one wider footpath and a cycle path with a high kerb to separate the cycle path from the pedestrians and the cars. Interestingly the law in Denmark states clearly if a car/van/lorry/bus is in collision with a cyclist the cyclist is never at fault – this is of course a matter for central government
Of course the other solution may be to have only one wide footpath [ on the co-op side ]with a high kerb.
The Danish and many other European countries have successfully made their city’s safer and pleasanter to live in. Hopefully we can do the same
Malcolm Ward

Comments

    • Get Real . This is a typical example of cloud cuckoo land thinking. What we really need is a bypass,. never going to happen! although Hilperton seems to have got one reasonably quickly , could it be that Wiltshire Council have got fed up with the beard and sandal brigade holding anything up in Bradford that doesn’t conform to its Jane Austin time warp ideal for the town, witness the pedestrian bridge fiasco. Next best is a one way system, a no brainer this, just get on with it . Narrow the road on the town bridge , do me a favour !! there is barely enough room for two cars to pass now, let alone a bus and a car. this is not Denmark , or Holland , the cyclist not at fault ! , I am fed up with arrogant cyclists , they slow up traffic. they pay no road tax yet have the temerity to complain about potholes , they carry no insurance they are saving the planet so that’s alright.
      Steve F

      • You’re right, a bypass is never going to happen because it would be ludicrously expensive and may not even have much impact if it turns out that most of the traffic in town is local. A one way system is a bad idea because it’ll just move the congestion out of the centre of town, speed up traffic, and lead to people finding rat runs down residential streets.

        Dissuading drivers from going through town is probably our best hope, at least for now, and narrowing the town bridge would definitely help with this. There’s also a new proposal for a pedestrian bridge on the way and this time it’s up to those of us without beards or sandals to support it and make sure it happens.

        Finally, not all cyclists are arrogant and many of us also drive cars. There’s been no such thing as “road tax” since 1937, by the way: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23694438

        • Hear hear, a bypass will never happen, we dont have enough people in the town to fund it. We are all in love with cars, one way systems make people drive faster – proven fact. we certainly need a simple well thought out footbridge avoiding that hideous crossing we all undertake everyday, with pushchairs, small children etc.Whilst on LW on a Monday the number count for vehicles in 2 hr slot was 2.276, in school holidays last week it dropped to 1550 same slot. This is all vehicles. that tells you a fairly good fact. The traffic volume has risen enormously in the last 2 years (this is a fact) This is an A trunk road, (cant be changed) its main route to the ports and dock areas, and the UK buys online, so there are 1000s of delivery vans coming throught the town every day. Personally I think a one way system will do no good whatsoever. Ive been here all my life, and its always just moved the problems elsewhere- like down new road onto the Holt Rd. Maybe using your local vote on 4th May may change the way the town works…cant be worse!

        • The town already has a pedestrian bridge.

          Have you noticed the number of people who cross the road between The Shambles and The Swan rather than using the crossing a few yards away? I guarantee you the same will happen with another pedestrian bridge, people will continue to use the most convenient option, generally the road bridge, irrespective of how many pedestrian bridges there are.

    • I side on balance with Simon Starr, who expresses his views politely and coherently.
      A one-way system may indeed provide some benefits – but will also bring problems. In my view it’s essential to have the objectives clear: anything that is done primarily to help traffic flow will just produce more motorists – travelling faster unless the detailed design is carefully considered.
      OWS is definitely NOT a ‘no brainer’ as Mr Frampton thinks.

    • I side on balance with Simon Starr, who expresses his views politely and coherently.
      A one-way system may indeed provide some benefits – but will also bring problems. In my view it’s essential to have the objectives clear: anything that is done primarily to help traffic flow will just produce more motorists – travelling faster unless the detailed design is carefully considered.
      OWS is definitely NOT a ‘no brainer’ as Mr Frampton thinks.
      PS, re the originating article … yes, higher kerbs, to keep motorists in their place. Vehicles routinely use pavements, damaging the kerbs and intimidating pedestrians. I have asked County engineers before now what is the standard for the kerb height between road and pavement, and have never received an answer.

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